I Wish I Could Go to Me!

Even dentists need dental care. Last august, I fell 10 feet from an extension ladder (really, the ladder fell and I went with it) while painting my garage. I know, I’ve heard it a thousand times, you can afford to hire someone, but I was taught by my father that if you can do something for yourself, you should. Enough of that!

I thought it would be beneficial ( both to my patients as well as myself ) to share my dental experience as I go through removing my front tooth and having an implant placed. As you can see from this photo, tooth #9 was completely fractured off.

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Three days after the fall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luckily , the day that this picture was taken, my brother in law Don said, lets go and see if we can find your tooth.  We unfolded the beige tarp that I had under the ladder and despite the beige paint all over the tarp I immediately spotted my tooth as if I had a cosmic connection to it.

I saw the dentist , Dr. David Newkirk in Naperville, several days later and he determined that the tooth was non- restorable and that  an implant was indicated. Luckily he was able to temporarily bond my tooth back in place. Thanks Don and Dave!

Next stop, the periodontist. Dr. David McClenahan in Libertyville  for an Implant Consult.

 

By: Brian R. Guldbek, D.D.S.

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ALLERGY TO LATEX

Latex Gloves

Latex Gloves

   Natural rubber latex is a common ingredient found in many consumer products, such as balloons, balls, appliance cords, hoses, hot water bottles, pacifiers, swimwear, toys, tires, condoms, rubber bands and shoes. Latex also can be found in many medical or dental supplies and devices, such as masks, gloves, syringes, catheters, dressings, tape and bandages.??Unlike some consumer goods made from synthetic (manmade) latex, such as house paint, natural rubber latex is derived from a milky substance found in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).??While many people come in safe contact with latex-containing products every day, some susceptible individuals have developed hypersensitivity to proteins derived from natural rubber latex, which can cause allergic reactions.

 

 

By: Brian R. Guldbek, D.D.S.

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Provisonal Restorations Part 2

We discussed in Part 1 the difference between a temporary crown and a provisional restoration. In Part 2 we will go through the actual lab phase of how we fabricate a provional restoration.

Step 1

We take a pre-op impression of the tooth/teeth we are going to prpare for a crown. Here is a picture of the patient before treatment.

 bing preop

 Step 2

 In the lab we pour up a silicone model of the pre-op impression

Silicone Model

Silicone Model

 Step 3

A wax up of the broken or misaligned teeth on the preop model  is made to the size, shape and contour that we want to achieve. Then we make a putty matrix of the altered cast.

Wax up of Pre-op model

Wax up of Pre-op model

Putty Matrix

Putty Matrix

Step 4

A self cure composite is flowed into the putty matrix and the indexed silicone model is inserted and removed after material has set.

BRG_1407

Putty matrix with model and composite material

Provisional immediately after removal from matrix

Provisional immediately after removal from matrix

  

Step 5

After trimming , finishing and polishing the provisional restoration is ready to be delivered to the patient.

Provisional Restoration

Provisional Restoration

 

 

By: Brian R. Guldbek, D.D.S.

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4 e.max all ceramic crowns

We delivered 4 e.max all ceramic crowns for our patient today.

ron bing

4 emax crowns

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Full Face photo of 4 emax crowns

Two photos immediately after cementation.

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the before photos on our main website www.libertyviledentistry.com under the current cases tab

 

By: Brian R. Guldbek, D.D.S.

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Diastema Closure

This is a recent case of a patient who was dissatified with the large space between her front teeth. Despite the challenges of a large space and alreday wide teeth, we achieved an excellent result. This was achieved with Direct Composite Bonding.

diastema preop

Pre-op Photo of Diastema

Diastema Postop

Post -Op Photo with Closure

 

By: Brian R. Guldbek, D.D.S.

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E-Max Lower Anterior Crowns

This was a case of crowded lower anterior teeth which many of my patients complain about after years after orthodontics. There are of course many treatment options to correct the crowding but in this case it was decided that a restorative route was the best solution. As you can see the esthetics of the Emax crowns are outstanding but what is even more important is the proper contour, shape, alignment and fit which we have achieved.

Emax Crowns

Emax Crowns

 

 

By: Brian R. Guldbek, D.D.S.

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All Ceramic Crowns

IPS e.max has become the industry standard material for metal-free, all-ceramic restorations.  IPS e.max provides unmatched strength (360 – 400 MPa flexural strength) and versatility.   Here at Heritage Dental we use e.max as the primary ceramic material for our layered crowns, pressed monolithic crowns, veneers, and inlay / onlays. These crowns are extrememly strong and esthetic. Take a look at a recently cemented e.max crown we did for one of our patients.

                                      EMax Crown

 

 

 

 

 

By: Brian R. Guldbek, D.D.S.

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